Stratton Lock and Dam lock capacity and water level control improvements

Project Summary

The Stratton Lock and Dam in McHenry, Illinois, is the lifeblood of the Chain O'Lakes. It helps move approximately 24,000 recreational boats from the upper Fox River to the lower Fox River in Algonquin, Illinois, and back again. Its gates push water south when the Chain O’Lakes is full, while holding water during the hot summer months.

Officials with the Illinois Department of Natural Resources (IDNR) found the gates were showing their age from deterioration of the concrete structure and obsolete equipment conditions, plus the boat lock was antiquated and lacked the capacity to serve the boats on the busy waterway.

Improving lock capacity and water control were the key goals for Hanson’s study of the lock and dam structure on the upper Fox River. IDNR hired Hanson in 2011 to provide a Phase I pre-design report to review and summarize previous engineering analyses regarding improvements and alternatives. The project also included the remote control and monitoring of the Obermeyer gate at Algonquin.

Stratton Lock, constructed in 1960, is 22 feet wide by 62 feet long with two miter gates. The sluice gate structure was constructed in 1939 and consists of five 13.75-foot-wide vertical lift gates, along with the adjacent Obermeyer gate on the fixed crest dam. The gates provide water control on the Fox River for the surrounding prime residential and environmentally sensitive areas, as well as water supply to downstream communities.

Hanson’s team reviewed prior studies related to the lock and dam condition and to increasing the lock capacity. It evaluated various alternatives, including lock extension and a new parallel lock, with respect to constructability, construction costs operations and maintenance (O&M), redundancy and safety.

Team members evaluated the existing conditions at the lock and dam. They also developed gate structure replacement alternatives.

Hanson provided engineering and design services for the project, which included analyses; design; preparation of plans; specifications; permitting; construction cost estimating; and O&M manuals.

Because boat sizes have increased since the original lock was built in 1960, only four large boats could safely pass through the lock at once. The redesigned, larger lock can now accommodate eight larger boats at one time. The new gate structure uses three hinged crest gates to replace the sluice gate structure. The new gate design allows IDNR to better control the upstream pool elevation of the Fox River.

Hanson has provided support to IDNR through bidding and construction.

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